How Much Does Your Doctor Make?

You would never guess it by how much they whine every time the federal government proposes Medicare payment cuts, but most doctors are doing very well on the salary front. Compared with most professions outside Wall Street, doctors are paid handsomely. And unlike many workers these days, their salaries are generally keeping pace with inflation. A doctor who becomes a cardiologist or a radiologist commands twice ($380,000 or more) what a pediatrician ($190,000) does. And doctors who choose to practice in the Midwest or South instead of the Northeast or West Coast can add anywhere from $10,000 to $60,000 to their salaries. Cardiologist salaries have nearly doubled in the last decade to a hefty $442,000, thanks in part to the explosion in lucrative cardiac stent procedures, according to data from Merritt Hawkins in Dallas, which tracks doctors’ salaries. A general surgeon still makes about 50% more ($328,000) than an internist ($194,000). [Read the full article]

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All doctors are paid well, despite their constant carping about Medicare payment cuts. Salaries for primary care physicians have generally tracked inflation, while salaries for specialties like cardiology and radiology have surged. Here is what some of the doctors you see are likely to be making. All doctors are paid well, despite their constant carping about Medicare payment cuts. Salaries for primary care physicians have generally tracked inflation, while salaries for specialties like cardiology and radiology have surged. Here is what some of the doctors you see are likely to be making. [Read the full article]

Molina Healthcare Inc. posted a fourth-quarter loss Thursday on higher medical costs.

The company lost $4.5 million, or 18 cents per share, compared with profit of $14.8 million, or 55 cents per share, during the same period a year prior. Revenue rose 19 percent to $964.2 million from $812.5 million.

Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters expected a loss of 16 cents per share on revenue of $961.1 million.

Expenses rose 23 percent to $967.9 million, driven mainly by rising medical costs. The medical care ratio was rose to 86.8 percent from 84.8 percent. The medical care ratio is the percentage of premiums paid to cover medical claims.

For the full year, the company earned $30.9 million, or $1.19 per share, after profit of $59.6 million, or $2.15 per share, in 2008. Revenue rose to $3.67 billion from $3.11 billion.

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Looking ahead, the company expects 2010 profit of about $1.50 per share on $3.9 billion in revenue. [Read the full article]

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