Top Performing Large Cap Funds Makes Some Headway

Large-cap stock mutual funds have trailed small- and midcap funds for much of the past 15 years.

How much would you have in your account now if you had invested $ 10,000 in the average large-cap fund on Dec. 31, 1999? You’d have $ 16,641 as of Jan. 9 this year, according to Morningstar Inc. data.

That’s way below the $ 37,371 that the average small-cap mutual fund would have generated in that time and the $ 34,806 that the average midcap fund would have returned.

The S&P 500 would have put $ 18,573 in an investor’s pocket or retirement plan.

But funds focused on big-cap stock investing have made up a bit of ground in the past five years, especially since June. Since the market bottom in March 2009, large-cap stock funds have returned 180% vs. midcap funds’ 248%, small-cap funds’ 241% and the S&P 500’s 190%.

Since last June, large-cap stock funds are up 5.7% vs. 4.6% for midcap funds, 1.5% for small-cap funds and 5.6% for the S&P 500.

Century Shares Trust Institutional Class Fund has returned an average annual 9.63% the past 15 years vs. 4.48% for the S&P 500. The $ 222 million fund, managed by Alexander Thorndike since 1999 and Kevin Callahan since 2001, handed investors a 13.4% return last year and is up 2% this year.

The fund’s recent holdings include Actavis (NYSE:ACT), Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Celgene (NASDAQ:CELG).

Actavis’ stock has retaken the buy point of a late-stage flat base. Analysts expect the company, which is due to report Q4 earnings next week, to show 15% growth, with earnings next year rising 21%.

Apple’s stock is within buying range after breaking out above a second-stage flat base Tuesday. The maker of iPhones and iPads recently reported fiscal Q4 earnings growth of 48%, which blew past expectations. Earnings this year are seen climbing 33%.

Apple, which just became the first company to surpass $ 700 billion in market cap, is negotiating with TV programmers for content in its efforts to provide TV over the Internet. Celgene’s Q4 earnings beat Wall Street expectations with a 33% gain. Analysts see 30% growth this year.

Large-cap stock mutual funds have trailed small- and midcap funds for much of the past 15 years.

How much would you have in your account now if you had invested $ 10,000 in the average large-cap fund on Dec. 31, 1999? You’d have $ 16,641 as of Jan. 9 this year, according to Morningstar Inc. data.

That’s way below the $ 37,371 that the average small-cap mutual fund would have generated in that time and the $ 34,806 that the average midcap fund would have returned.

The S&P 500 would have put $ 18,573 in an investor’s pocket or retirement plan.

But funds focused on big-cap stock investing have made up a bit of ground in the past five years, especially since June. Since the market bottom in March 2009, large-cap stock funds have returned 180% vs. midcap funds’ 248%, small-cap funds’ 241% and the S&P 500’s 190%.

Since last June, large-cap stock funds are up 5.7% vs. 4.6% for midcap funds, 1.5% for small-cap funds and 5.6% for the S&P 500.

Century Shares Trust Institutional Class Fund has returned an average annual 9.63% the past 15 years vs. 4.48% for the S&P 500. The $ 222 million fund, managed by Alexander Thorndike since 1999 and Kevin Callahan since 2001, handed investors a 13.4% return last year and is up 2% this year.

The fund’s recent holdings include Actavis (NYSE:ACT), Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Celgene (NASDAQ:CELG).

Actavis’ stock has retaken the buy point of a late-stage flat base. Analysts expect the company, which is due to report Q4 earnings next week, to show 15% growth, with earnings next year rising 21%.

Apple’s stock is within buying range after breaking out above a second-stage flat base Tuesday. The maker of iPhones and iPads recently reported fiscal Q4 earnings growth of 48%, which blew past expectations. Earnings this year are seen climbing 33%.

Apple, which just became the first company to surpass $ 700 billion in market cap, is negotiating with TV programmers for content in its efforts to provide TV over the Internet. Celgene’s Q4 earnings beat Wall Street expectations with a 33% gain. Analysts see 30% growth this year.

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