Poll: Minor shift in feelings on Trump administration’s relationship with Russia amid House Intel Committee probe

President Donald Trump and his campaign’s relationship with Russia have dominated headlines as the House Intelligence Committee investigates Russia’s alleged interference in the 2016 election.

But if there is one bright spot for the Trump administration, it appears the recent developments have not shifted public opinion significantly on the matter.

A new AOL News poll found the majority of those surveyed are concerned with the Trump administration’s relationship with Russia — but those results remain largely unchanged over the last month.

Key players in Trump-Russia connection allegations

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Key players in Trump-Russia connection allegations

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Paul Manafort

Paul Manafort signed on as Donald Trump’s campaign manager in March 2016. A longtime Republican strategist and beltway operative, Manafort had previously served as an adviser to former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovich — a pro-Russia leader who was violently ousted in 2014. Manafort resigned from his campaign position in August 2016 amid questions over his lobbying history in Ukraine for an administration supportive of Russia. The former campaign manager reportedly remained in Trump’s circle during the post-election transition period.

Michael Flynn

Gen. Michael Flynn was named President Trump’s national security adviser in November of 2016. Flynn reportedly met and spoke with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December, at one point discussing sanctions. Flynn originally told Vice President Pence he did not discuss sanctions — a point the Department of Justice said made the national security adviser subject to blackmail. Flynn resigned from his position in February.

Sergey Kislyak

Outgoing Russian ambassador to the United States Sergey Kislyak is the Russian official U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions — communication Sessions denied during his Senate committee hearing testimony.

Roger Stone

Stone is a longtime Republican political consultant who served as a campaign adviser to Trump who continued to talk with the then-GOP candidate after stepping away from his adviser role. Stone claimed last year that he had knowledge of the planned WikiLeaks release of emails pertaining to Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee. Stone recently admitted to speaking via direct message with “Guccifer 2.0” — an online entity U.S. officials believe is tied to Russia. Stone says the correspondence was “completely innocuous.”

Jeff Sessions

Former U.S. senator Jeff Sessions from Alabama joined Trump’s campaign as a foreign policy adviser in February 2016. Sessions was nominated to be U.S. attorney general by President Trump and was then confirmed by the Senate. Reports then emerged that Sessions had spoken twice with Sergey Kislyak while he was senator — a fact that he left out of his Senate hearing testimony. Instead, he said in writing that he had not communicated with any Russian officials during the campaign season. Sessions defended himself saying he had spoken with Kislyak specifically in a senate capacity.

Russian President Vladimir Putin

James Comey

Carter Page

Page worked for Merrill Lynch as an investment banker out of their Moscow office for three years before joining Trump’s campaign as a foreign policy adviser. During his time with Merrill Lynch, Page advised transactions for two major Russian entities. Page has called Washington “hypocritical” for focusing on corruption and democratization in addressing U.S. relations with Russia. While Page is someone Trump camp has seemingly tried to distance itself from, Page recently said he has made frequent visits to Trump Tower.

J.D. Gordon

Before Gordon joined the Trump campaign as a national security adviser in March 2016, he served as a Pentagon spokesman from 2005 through 2009. Like others involved in Trump-Russia allegations, Gordon met with ambassador Kislyak in July at the Republican National Convention, but has since denied any wrongdoing in their conversation. He advocated for and worked to revise the RNC language on and position toward Ukraine relations, so it was more friendly toward Russia’s dealings in the country.

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A survey conducted from March 25 to 27 found 55 percent of respondents are currently concerned about the Trump administration’s relationship with Russia, compared to 52 percent who said they were concerned in late February. The percentage of those who are not concerned dropped from 45 percent in February’s survey to 43 in the most recent one as well.

Only two percent of those recently polled say they aren’t sure how they feel about the possible connection.

SEE ALSO: White House denies trying to block a testimony before House Intel Committee

The February poll was conducted shortly after former senior national security advisor Michael Flynn resigned from his post for misleading Vice President Mike Pence and other White House officials about his conversations with Russia’s ambassador to the United States.

The new survey comes in the midst of the House Intelligence Committee’s probe into Russia’s alleged tampering in the election. Committee Chairman Devin Nunes announced Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort, who reportedly made millions secretly working for a Russian billionaire to influence politics and business in America, voluntarily submitted to be interviewed by the intelligence committee shortly before the poll was taken.

In addition, FBI Director James Comey confirmed that the bureau has been investigating potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials since late July shortly before it was taken.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn

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Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn

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Retired United States Army lieutenant general Michael T. Flynn introduces Republican Presidential nominee Donald J. Trump before he delivered a speech at The Union League of Philadelphia on September 7, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Trump spoke about his plans to build up the military if elected. Recent national polls show the presidential race is tightening with two months until the election.

(Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, prepares to testify at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing in Dirksen Building titled ‘Current and Future Worldwide Threats,’ featuring testimony by he and James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn arrives at the Trump Tower for meetings with US President-elect Donald Trump, in New York on November 17, 2016.

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, at podium, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump attend a campaign event with veterans at the Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Ave., NW, where Trump stated he believes President Obama was born in the United States, September 16, 2016.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

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Nunes canceled multiple meeting this week and is now facing calls to step down from Democratic House leaders after he admitted to meeting with a secret source at the White House to review intelligence reports.

The Washington Post released a report on Tuesday, claiming the White House sought to block former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates’ testimony before the committee. The White House refuted the report, calling it “entirely false.”

The House Intelligence Committee’s top Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff said on Tuesday Yates would have disclosed details surrounding Flynn’s attempt to “cover up” his past interactions with Russian officials.

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